15 4 / 2014

Plush/doll a day #1
Orange kitty

Plush/doll a day #1
Orange kitty

12 4 / 2014

This is my inflatable head. He’s vinyl, portable, and none too chatty. I often work on stuff during cons and today is no exception. He has his choice of two hats, and I am starting to think that he needs a mask. Thing is, I am not sure what to make. I may use my Rorschach mask, but am looking into Bleach hollows as well.

This is my inflatable head. He’s vinyl, portable, and none too chatty. I often work on stuff during cons and today is no exception. He has his choice of two hats, and I am starting to think that he needs a mask. Thing is, I am not sure what to make. I may use my Rorschach mask, but am looking into Bleach hollows as well.

12 4 / 2014

UBCon Saturday.

UBCon Saturday.

11 4 / 2014

UBCon is underway. Big thank you to my neighbor for taking the picture!

UBCon is underway. Big thank you to my neighbor for taking the picture!

08 4 / 2014

More buttons

More buttons

04 4 / 2014

While relaxed as it was profitable, ConBust was tiring nevertheless. I cheated a little with this week’s Project Poppet. Last year, I prepped for a great deal of Comic Book conventions, more than I should have done. After too many long nights sewing, knitting and feeling panic over both the shows, I got a little loopy and started taking pictures of any scenario that might look remotely funny for the con prep strips. I did the same photographing my table at the shows, which generated the convention strips. 
It actually kind of worked for this week as I started reading the Skeletor is Love blog, which you can access at http://skeletorislove.tumblr.com/ I have to say, not only is this funny, but it’s helpful as I have been having rough personal patches.

While relaxed as it was profitable, ConBust was tiring nevertheless. I cheated a little with this week’s Project Poppet. Last year, I prepped for a great deal of Comic Book conventions, more than I should have done. After too many long nights sewing, knitting and feeling panic over both the shows, I got a little loopy and started taking pictures of any scenario that might look remotely funny for the con prep strips. I did the same photographing my table at the shows, which generated the convention strips.

It actually kind of worked for this week as I started reading the Skeletor is Love blog, which you can access at http://skeletorislove.tumblr.com/ I have to say, not only is this funny, but it’s helpful as I have been having rough personal patches.

03 4 / 2014

Anonymous asked: Do you have any advice for those wanting to sell at Artists Alley?

steveyurko:

I am by no means the wise elder of Artist Alleys, but here are some of the things I have picked up on over the last 4 years that can help you!

  • Have a variety of different subjects in your prints or other merch.
    You’ll definitely reach out to more fans that way.  I used to have an over abundance of One Piece art, which served me well, but expanding into other series will bring in more potential customers.  This leads to my next piece of advice.
  • Draw what you like!
    Don’t ever feel that you need to keep up with the latest fads to make a profit at a convention.  When you draw something you don’t really care for, it will show in your art and can be obvious sometimes.  If your heart is really into a certain series, your passion will be evident in your piece, and fans will dig it.  You’d also be surprised by what some people go crazy for.  Nostalgia is an important factor to consider.
  • Be yourself, not another artist!
    Your style is your thumbprint.  No one can be you and you shouldn’t try to be another artist.  Bring your own unique style to an artist alley and you will have a unique product that nobody can replicate.  It varies from con to con, but often times there are fans that will love the way you draw a certain show or character.  Don’t be afraid to put your own spin on things.
  • Act like a human being!
    This is a broad subject here.  For starters, you should treat con attendees with respect.  Always greet them with a hello, and maybe ask how their con is going.  Ignoring them or staring at them can make them feel less inclined to give you their money.  Dropping everything you’re doing is not the necessity.  If you’re working on a commission or talking with your tablemate that’s totally fine, but always be sure to acknowledge the attendee’s presence.  You do not have to badger them with a sales pitch.  If anything, that is a huge turnoff.  You’re not selling a car, you’re selling your art and it usually speaks for itself.  Original art and comics may often need context provided.  That is an appropriate time to pitch your product. The attendee approaches your table because something has caught their eye.  This expands into the next segment.
  • Be a fan!
    If someone is pleased to see you drew “Blahbidy Blah,” talk to them about “Blahbidy Blah!”  Con-goers are at cons because they are fans, and they always enjoy talking to other fans that share the same interests.  Showing your passion or fandom will put you in good graces, and you might just have made yourself a customer.  That customer could lead to a returning customer, or customer that recommends you to other fans of “Blahbidy Blah,” or even a new friend!  I should remind you that just because an attendee does not buy anything at the time does not mean they won’t come back.  If you’re friendly, and they really love your art, they might just come back later that weekend.  Stay positive!

Best of luck to you!

27 3 / 2014

Buttons for ConBust. Hope they go over well.

Buttons for ConBust. Hope they go over well.

25 3 / 2014

This is a tecre button press. This will occupy my evenings this week.

This is a tecre button press. This will occupy my evenings this week.

21 3 / 2014

Female villain set-Gotham edition

Female villain set-Gotham edition